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A Disorderly House

St. Peter's Church, Church Street, Liverpool

St. Peter’s Church, Church Street, Liverpool

Charles Archibald Irwin, the son of Archibald Irwin and Margaret Doyle, was born on 10th June 1849 in Liverpool and baptised twelve days later at St. Peter’s Church. In 1851, he is recorded as living with his family at 2 Smith Street but, for some unknown reason, cannot be found on the 1861 and 1871 censuses.

The only confirmed information about Charles during that time is taken from his marriage certificate. On 29th August 1870, he married Rosena Lilly, the daughter of Frederick Henry Lilly, at St. John’s Church, Liverpool, his occupation being given as a blockmaker.

Charles and Rosena went on to have six children, one, Harriet Lilly Irwin, being born in Birkenhead, before the family relocated to Nottingham. Whilst in Nottingham, three more children were born: Ellen Sophia in 1881, Archibald in 1883 and Margaret in 1885. It was while they were in Nottingham that Charles made the local press…

On Christmas Eve, 1886, Charles Archibald Irwin appeared at the Summons Court at the Town Hall in Nottingham accused of keeping or assisting to keep a disorderly house at 32 Rigley’s Yard. Mr. S. G. Johnson, the Town Clerk, stated that Charles was a tenant of the house, as he resided there and practically kept and managed the place. On the nights of the 11th and 18th of December, the house was watched by Sergeant Stannard and P.C. Oaks who reported that the people entering the premises were, “well-known bad characters.”

During examination, one of the police officers stated that he had worked for the Nottingham Police Force for nine years, but during that time, he had not been aware that the house was being kept as a coffee-house, but he believed that Charles had a coffee-house licence. When questioned Charles denied the charge, saying that his step-father had kept the house for many years before he had anything to do with it.

Testimonial in response to George Baker's, 'Belt of Life.'

Testimonial in response to George Baker’s, ‘Belt of Life.’

Research has shown that this ‘step-father’ was, in fact, Arthur Cresswell, the step-father of his wife, who is recorded on the 1881 Census in Rigley’s Yard as being a boarding house keeper. A testimonial appearing in numerous editions of the Nottingham Evening Post from 1880 to 1882 for George Baker’s, ‘Belt of Life,’ also backs this up – Sophia Cresswell was the mother of Rosena Lilly, the wife of Charles Archibald Irwin.

Unfortunately for Charles, the magistrates did not believe him and he was fined £10. Soon after, the Irwin family left Nottingham and moved to Cardiff where, by now, he was a Venetian blind maker. Charles and Rosena had a further child whilst in Cardiff, George, born in 1892. Charles Archibald Irwin died in Bridgend in 1903.

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