Gomoszynski and the Polish Connection

Sometimes, when researching your family history and something unexpected is discovered, it is possible to go off on a tangent and look at something that has nothing whatsoever to do with your family. This happened to me recently.

For some time, I had been trying to prove a family connection to Thomas Green, a watchmaker from Liverpool, a task which proved successful. In the course of finding out more information about his family, I discovered that one of his daughters, Catherine Green (the sister of my great-great-great-great grandmother, Mary Green) married a Liverpool attorney, Thomas Hughes. They are both buried at St. James Cemetery, Liverpool and their monumental inscription reads as follows:

To my mother, erected 1869. Sacred to the memory of Thomas HUGHES, Attorney of this town, who died on the 26th February 1848 in the 70th year of his age.

Also James, son of the above, who departed this life on the 6th May 1852 aged 35 years.

Also Catherine, wife of the above Thomas HUGHES,
who departed this life on the 9th May 1869 aged 79 years.

Also in memory of Jane GOMOSZYNSKI, wife of the late Joseph GOMOSZYNSKI, who died 17th May 1877 aged 70 years.

I was immediately taken aback by the name Gomoszynski. Jane, turned out to be Jane Hughes, a daughter of Thomas Hughes from his previous marriage but I was intrigued about Joseph. Who was he? A bit of research answered that question.

Joseph Gomoszynski arrived in London from Danzig, Poland on 12th July 1836 on a Russian passport. He had been a Lieutenant in the 1st Regiment of Polish Lancers who had fought in the November Uprising on 1830/1 against the Russians. Due to Poland being allies of Napoleon, after his downfall, the Congress of Vienna, in 1815, assigned half of Poland to Russia. The other half was to govern itself but the Russians did not allow this to happen and, as a result, serious opression led to the uprising. He was subsequently imprisoned by Prussians, eventually leaving his country in 1832 and escaping into exile.

Marriage of Joseph Gomoszynski to Jane Hughes, Carlisle Journal, Saturday 11 January 1840

Marriage of Joseph Gomoszynski to Jane Hughes, Carlisle Journal, Saturday 11 January 1840

On 30th December 1839, Joseph married Jane Hughes at John’s Episcopal Church, Greenock. Their marriage was recorded in several newspapers including the Carlisle Journal.

In 1840, the couple had their first child, Catherine Stanislove Gomoszynski, born in Leeds. A year later, on the 1841 Census, the family were living in Headingley, where Joseph gave his occupation as ‘Professor of Languages.’ Adverts later appeared in the Leeds Intelligencer offering his services as a French and German instructor.

Liverpool Mercury,  Friday 3 December 1841

Liverpool Mercury, Friday 3 December 1841

Later in 1841, Gomoszynski gave a series of three lectures on the history of Poland in Bradford and also in Liverpool, the birthplace of his wife. At this time, he was still residing in Leeds and it was here where, in 1842, a second child, Emily Jane was born. By 1845, however, the family were back in Scotland where two more children were born – Joseph Francis Dudley and Casimir Thomas.

Grave of Joseph Gomoszynski at Glasgow Necropolis

Grave of Joseph Gomoszynski at Glasgow Necropolis

Sadly, on 27th October 1845, Joseph Gomoszynski died in Greenock, aged only 32. He was buried at Glasgow Necropolis where a headstone, sculpted by William Mossman, was erected in his honour

For more information about Joseph Gomoszynski, Morag T. Fyfe has written a very detailed profile on http://www.glasgownecropolis.org/profiles/joseph-f-gomoszynski/

His lectures from 1841 have also been reproduced and can be purchased from Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Course-Three-Lectures-History-Poland/dp/1165258978/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1424111414&sr=8-2&keywords=gomoszynski